1. rejigger reblogged this from improvnonsense and added:
    As an improv instructor, the main reason I see that my students (and even non-students) argue on stage is that they’re...
  2. joxmacd reblogged this from theangeladee and added:
    I wholeheartedly agree that there is a bit of “gee shucks, be nice to everybody” in American comedy. People have self...
  3. improv-is-easy reblogged this from jasonspecland
  4. speakeasyimprovnyc reblogged this from improvnonsense and added:
    The identification of stateless conversations is exactly what we need. A stateless conversation has no Game, no real...
  5. improvnonsense reblogged this from curtisretherford and added:
    Arguing in scenes is okay but hard, especially for beginners. You get trapped into having your character succeed over...
  6. jasonspecland reblogged this from improv-is-easy and added:
    I want to take that workshop, just so that the first words out of my mouth every week can be, “Is this the right room...
  7. curtisretherford reblogged this from theangeladee and added:
    Angela, I agree that arguments are not in any way particular to English humor. In fact, most 101-301 students start with...
  8. downrightupright reblogged this from theangeladee and added:
    I really enjoyed this post. There is an art to arguing and to saying no and doing all these things, and I wish these...
  9. khealywu said: However, I am told not to argue regularly, and I really like English comedic sensibilities. In general, I think arguing well in improv scenes is a skill that needs to be learned.
  10. nicclee reblogged this from theangeladee and added:
    I like this different perspective. I feel like arguing in and of itself is not the problem. In fact, we can argue in...
  11. theangeladee posted this
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